Episode 675

Attorney and Author Vivek Ramaswamy Lays Out the Legal Remedy for Cancel Culture

00:00:00
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00:18:45

March 30th, 2021

18 mins 45 secs

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About this Episode

From the Mandalorian's Gina Carano to everyday citizens Americans are becoming uncomfortably aware of just how easy it is to be canceled. What can we do about it? Vivek is a brilliant legal mind and serial entrepreneur who has done the heavy lifting for us! Not only are we protected from being fired for holding non woke viewpoints on political and social issues, we can defend ourselves against the actions of the woke mob.

Vivek Ramaswamy is a Harvard educated Yale grad, attorney, serial entrepreneur, and frequent guest opinion writer for the Wall Stree Journal, Newsweek and other print and online publications. His new book Woke Inc. comes out in August of 2021.

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Episode Links

  • Save America's Workers from the Church of Wokeness | Opinion — Often forgotten is that Title VII protects not only religious employees from being fired for their beliefs, but equally protects nonreligious employees from being fired for refusing to endorse an employer-mandated religion. "What matters in this context is not so much what [the employee's] own religious beliefs were," the Seventh Circuit federal court of appeals said in the 1997 Venters v. City of Delphi. What matters is whether the employee was "fired because he did not share or follow his employer's religious beliefs."